Unchaining & Unleashing: Winning Against Overwhelm

Beyond making a list of things to do and doing them one by one, there is a way to deal with the modality of overwhelm. When things get too complicated, seek the simplest solutions, pull back right and then deal with everything. Sure, I could give stronger or weaker advice, indeed. Mostly though, it takes […]

Unchaining & Unleashing: Winning Against Overwhelm

Beyond making a list of things to do and doing them one by one, there is a way to deal with the modality of overwhelm. When things get too complicated, seek the simplest solutions, pull back right and then deal with everything. Sure, I could give stronger or weaker advice, indeed. Mostly though, it takes just the approach I just mentioned not to sin on yourself or miss the mark against yourself.

We all love to succeed. Sometimes though, temporary failure and learning lessons is the answer to all genuine problems, though. Success at everything, all the time or perfection can be a bad thing anyway especially when it comes with undue stress to repeat the success “perfectly” or better it.

After all, to unleash the best within us, we need to know how to fail so that we can do its opposite ever better anyway. The genuine chains of consistent success without that knowledge leads to a genuine fear of failure or learning more anyway.

“This is how it has always been done” is the saying of the person who has never temporarily failed in order to ultimately do something better. “I am willing to learn” is the saying of those who can genuinely grow to greater and greater successes in everything. Think about that for a moment, then go on with this article.

Doing what has always been done never leads to a chain reaction of success, but creatively failing to do better always does when you find out how to do something genuinely better than before.

Sure, Henry Ford built the first mass-use car, but Walter Percy Chrsyler improved on it by bringing one home from a showroom, taking it apart, putting it together again and looking like a “crazy failure” until he did make a genuinely better car and earn success doing it. I hope that little story from the early twentieth century proves at least some of the point I am making with this article:

Learn from failure, understand what needs to be done and then make success permanent and failure temporary as the seed dies when it is planted and becomes a plant or tree and generates more life than that original seed had in it. Everything, including nature, fails forward to succeed ultimately and forever, can you?

So, in my personal thinking and actions, I see, feel and understand failure as a lesson, nothing personal and earned success through those lessons as practical and realistically personal.

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